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AtomLight

(1 customer review)

£5.99£9.99

The smallest LED keyring light available. Pea-sized, and weighing just under 5g.

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Description

The smallest LED keyring lights available. Pea-sized, and weighing just under 5g each!

Ideal for attaching to keys or jackets, or as lighting inside handbags, wallets and pouches. Great as an ‘always there’ source of light, to quickly provide up-close illumination.

AtomLight White: Bright white LED light.
AtomLight Hybrid: Unique ‘hybrid’ LED / photoluminescent light source. Bright, pale blue LED light, with bright green afterglow, allowing you to see the AtomLight in the dark, even when it is turned off.

Rugged construction with waterproof housing. Simple ‘twist on / off’ design. Ready to use with pre-installed batteries.

Just like an atom, an AtomLight is very tiny indeed! It is the smallest LED keyring light available. At just under 5g each (including the split ring) they are almost unnoticeable when carried; they make other keyring lights look huge. They can be attached to anything; they’re ideal for keys, jackets or bags. Despite its small size, the AtomLight is a very practical and useful light source.

The ‘Hybrid’ version features a hybrid LED / photoluminescent light source, which emits a green glow even when turned off; a feature that allows the AtomLight to be easily seen and found in the dark; perfect for those times when you’re fumbling to find the right key.

With a simple twist, each unit provides a gentle but useful amount of light, easily enough to illuminate a small room, search for something you have dropped or check a map. Ideal for emergencies when you need a light but the larger flashlight has been left behind. The waterproof housing means they can be relied on in all outdoor conditions, and being about 50 times smaller than a typical flashlight, they can be carried with you wherever you go.

They have dozens of uses for both urban and outdoor environments. A fantastic addition to survival kits, first aid kits, or any other equipment that would benefit from the addition of a little light.

Many people today rely upon a smartphone to provide a flashlight function without the extra bulk of a normal flashlight, but all too often smartphone batteries go flat. The AtomLight will serve as a great back-up to flat battery situations without adding any noticeable bulk to your every day carry items.

AtomLights are very tough and will withstand the rigours of daily use.

Available in 3 and 6 packs of the two varieties, as well as a mixed pack containing 3 of each.

The AtomLights come fitted with 20mm split rings and pre-installed batteries.
AtomLight dimensions: 14mm x 11.5mm diameter.
Weight: 4.98g.
Made in the UK by Polymath Products.

1 review for AtomLight

  1. Avatar

    David E Crossley

    Well here we go with yet another fascinating new product from Polymath. Not a fire lighting set this time but something to bring light to your life in times or places of darkness, the Polymath AtomLight!

    Currently available in packs of 3 for £5.99 or 6 for £9.99 the AtomLight is a development of the tiny survival light included in Polymath’s mini survival tin.

    Basically, they have taken the micro light, added a photoluminescent lens to the front and enclosed the whole in a rubber tube for greater durability and security. When you twist the torch to on you get a full power mini light, and as well as giving you the immediate light this recharges the GITD lens so when you turn the lamp off and for some time afterwards you have a glowing disk for gentler illumination.

    The tiny LED uses 3 SR621SW/AGI364 button cells, which are replaceable but not rechargeable. The light is more diffuse than most torches but remarkably bright from something of this tiny size. Although it doesn’t have the range for long distance illumination, at close range it is more than adequate for reading text or a map and the diffusion also makes it ideal for searching for something or in a bag or tent or dropped on the floor. The more limited amount of candlepower is also useful for times when you need some light but don’t want to advertise your presence to everyone in the area, or to wake someone close to you either by using a brighter torch or, conversely, by falling over something because you can’t see what is in front of you!

    At 10p.m. on the evening after receiving my order, I turned on 2 AtomLights to check the battery life on both and also the practical duration of the GITD feature. At this point the luminous disk on the ALs had only been exposed to daylight and were easily visible as green but not glowing brightly. After half an hour on permanently, the light on each was not quite so brilliant but usefulness wasn’t really affected. When I briefly turned one off however it was clear that thirty minutes charging of the luminous disk had it glowing nicely.
    After another half hour the lamps were noticably dimmer in illuminating the room but still bright enough to easily read text. When I checked the GITD I found that with less power going through it the glow wasn’t as high as before but still quite bright.

    At half past eleven, both were still good for text and map reading but after turning off the LED the greenness was evidently dulling. By midnight the GITD was even less glowing but still easy to see, and although when lit the torch needed to be a bit closer to the map, detail was then still clear.

    1a.m. and I was impressed but starting to realise I’d seriously underestimated these little lights and I wasn’t going to get much sleep! In fact at this stage I decided to call a halt; 3 hours continuous practical light output from such a miniscule source is more than I would ever have expected or required. I turned the lights off but the GITD source of the AL was still a very practical location aid, not initially seeming much less bright than it was an hour previously, but it did begin to ebb faster than before.

    Then, just from curiosity, a few minutes later I made a mistake and turned the AtomLight back on. The light was noticably brighter again, in fact I thought it was back to the level it had been at least half an hour earlier. It gradually faded until, after about 15 minutes, it was back to its brightness before I’d switched it off so I left it on, rebooted my computer and went and boiled the kettle to make a mug of caffeinated Kendal mint cake drink, then waited to see if it would last longer than I did before either it or I faded out (the things I do for you lot!). By half past 2 there was still light but I had to hold it pretty close to the paper to read text or map features and not enough for anything much else. The glow from the AtomLight photoilluminator was much dimmer now and not enough to use to illuminate anything but easily still bright enough to serve as a place marker to help you find the light, or some other piece of equipment to which it was attached, in the dark. Unfortunately though, neither the light nor the GITD were still bright enough for me to get a picture with my little camera.

    I consider 4 and a half hours plus of practical use from the AtomLight to be amazing and you can considerably extend that by intermittent use of the main light and the fully charged GITD function. The tiny size and negligilble weight make it perfectly viable to have several of these little stars connected to various parts of your kit so that if you lose one, or the batteries in one you regularly use do eventually go flat, then you have backups available.

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AtomLight dimensions: 14mm x 11.5mm diameter.
Weight: 4.98g.